Tag Archives: pizza

4 Reasons Why Marriage is Worth the Risk (Even in the Age of Ashley Madison)

Wow, look at that. John and I made it through two years of marriage without cheating on each other. Someone should probably give us a medal.

But seriously, doesn’t everything about Ashley Madison make marriage sound awful?

As a married person, I can’t help but be interested in the Ashley Madison scandal (even if I find the privacy invasion more than a little disconcerting). It’s heartbreaking to hear stories of spouses who have been betrayed by their significant other, and also fascinating to read various reasons why some individuals digitally invest in finding an affair. It’s also made me furious to read about Christian leaders who thought they could pull the “I’m forgiven, therefore there are no consequences” card when their Ashley Madison accounts were revealed.

If you based your opinion about marriage on what you hear in the news then you might think that it’s a pretty terrible deal. That’s why, for this post, I’m giving you 4 reasons why marriage is da bomb.

1) Someone always has your back

I have a lot of examples of this in our short marriage. John has served as my excuse to get out of lame events, and he has come along with me when there was no way out. We tag team in social conversations. We help each other out with jobs and homework and balancing life in between it all.

Today especially, I was reminded how lucky I am.

For the past few months I’ve been running a summer kids program. Today was our wrap-up party and John agreed to come help by leading some field games. As I was struggling to check in nearly 200 kids (while also coordinating food and drinks) I looked up and saw this.

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Even with their faces censored out this photo makes me laugh!

Seeing a mob of children chase my husband made me smile, not just because it was hilarious, but also because they were having so much fun. John is so great with kids, and today he saved my butt. He made a mediocre party into a party they will all remember. I mean, how often do you get to chase a guy around  a field trying to stomp on a piñata? Continue reading

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Body Positivity and “Healthy” Double Standards, or Why I Need Fat Acceptance Even Though I’m (Relatively) Thin

The moment you mention “fat” and anything positive in the same sentence you get a response that’s meant to put you in your place. It will usually go something like, “I don’t believe in encouraging unhealthy behaviour” or “I’m all for self-acceptance, but…”.

I certainly do understand this sentiment. I think social stigma can be a powerful way to discourage bad behaviour. Just look at MADD’s entire campaign against drunk driving, for example.

However, I do think there is an unnecessarily strong reaction against Fat Positivity. Below I’ve outlined 3 reasons why I think that reaction is unfair.

1) We overlook healthy individuals with large bodies because they don’t fit our cultural beauty standards 

The number one criticism of fat acceptance is that it encourages unhealthy behaviour. However, there are more and more examples that prove body size doesn’t always dictate health. Olympic hammer-thrower Amanda Bingson encountered this type of assumption when she was kicked off her high school volleyball team for not losing weight. Years later and she has been able to prove that a large body is just as capable of amazing things as a small body. It’s been encouraging to see her featured in this year’s ESPN Body Issue, the magazine’s “annual celebration of athletes’ amazing bodies”.

Another large and healthy individual who has come to my attention is yogi Jessamyn Stanley. I try (emphasis on try) to practice yoga every week, and yoga is, for me, one of the few physical activities I’m actually kind of okay at. That’s why I was stunned to see Stanley doing moves I am still far away from accomplishing. It’s clear to me that Stanley has the kind of core strength that most of the slender yogis in my classes still haven’t managed to build.

I cannot do this pose without assistance. I can maybe do a headstand on a good day, but just on my arms like this? No way.

Examples like Bingson and Stanley aren’t meant to prove that all large people are healthy. Instead, they offer a great reminder that size doesn’t necessarily dictate health. While large individuals are sometimes much more healthy than they look, some slim individuals can be much less healthy than they appear. Continue reading

Ch-ch-changes…

Yes, this is essentially my fourth, if you count today’s Writers’ Roundtable, post for the week, and I still have two more to go. That’s a lot of writing, folks.

We have a few changes taking place hereabouts, with the first at the recommendation of power-reader Orion. You may know who he is, because he leaves comments on a good number of posts, and that makes him super great.

Evan and Gordon Talk has been changed to Culture War Correspondence due to the fact that it’s not just Gordon and yours truly jabbering on at each other anymore. When it’s all three of us a CWR Writers’ Roundtable will take place, a name I chose in part because its initials are the same as this blog.

Another change under features is that addition of Culture War Reports, which Gordon started with his respective posts on attending a midget wrestling match and a musical. This feature will focus on the experience of attending events, which separates it from Reviews [which admittedly is just 2 Broke Girls at the moment, though I’ve been meaning to throw up a book review soon].

And that is all. Thank you for reading and keeping up to date with the goings-on around here. If you were not hungry you will be now, because here is a gif of pizza to conclude this update:

Jamie Oliver vs The Kids – Should we eat the whole chicken?

So this one time on Food Revolution Jamie Oliver tried to convince a group of kids that chicken nuggets were too disgusting to eat by showing them how nuggets are made from the skin, cartilage, internal organs and other worthless chicken leftovers. Unfortunately for him, the experiment backfired.

Continue reading

Fame Day: Reddit

When Gordon first introduced the concept of Shame Day and Fame Day posts it was to keep them short and sweet, and I’m going to try to stick to that as midnight is fast approaching.

When looking at my reddit homepage I can see that underneath the karma [fake internet points] that I have garnered it reads that I have been a redditor for a total of 11 months, and as such I think I can probably more or less comment on the site as a whole.

My first post about the site was admittedly more in line with Shame Day posts, and since then I’ve been quick to point out the site’s flaws to others, practically rejoicing when Anderson Cooper caused the shutdown of a section of the site dedicated to pictures of underage girls. Events like that, along with the mob mentality so prevalent in many threads and the tendency for redditors to somehow consider themselves superior to other internet users makes it very easy to judge Reddit as a whole.

Today, however, I’d like to look at the good that comes out of it. Continue reading